FEMA: What you didn’t know

 ( Don’t search for hours on the FEMA website.  Highlights are compiled below complete with hyperlinks to each arena of FEMA when you want to dive deeper into a specific topic controlled by FEMA )

How would you feel if you knew Hillary Clinton was in charge of FEMA relief?  I know, frightening, especially in light of her incompetence with Benghazi.  Yet, the Secretary of State is in charge of International groups through FEMA operating in the US.

The internet and Facebook is full of information bits and pieces on FEMA, United Nations personnel training in the US; and lists of items FEMA is storing at hundreds of camps located in all fifty states.  WHY, is the primary question pondered by readers who yearn for answers; but you will not like the answer.

Liberals tell you it is for quick response to Hurricane’s, Earthquakes, Tornadoes, and other natural disasters.  This is partially correct because the Federal response to hurricane Katrina left a bad taste in everyone’s mouth.  So to improve voter/citizens perception of how the Federal government responds to the next disaster won’t be a disaster again.

The 2nd reason is to be prepared for a terrorist attack wherever it may occur and is a National Preparedness scenario.

The 3rd reason is compliance with Presidential Directives, that are the same law.

Obama boastfully stated in 2014 he would pursue every loophole to circumvent Congressional approval to accomplish his agenda. Yes, like a dictator and Republican’s never “come out of their corner” until public outcry is sufficient to warrant a superficial public hearing.  Folks this is tyranny and we must stop it in its tracks.

So how is FEMA involved in all of this?  Good Question; however the answer is not simple.  To comprehend the Obama Administrations manipulation of the system and usurping Congress, you must learn several methods at his disposal to accomplish his threat.  This search leads to FEMA and provides the perfect example of how he can bypass Congress.

First, what methods are at his disposal?  Most people respond Executive Order, which is true; however many other unknown methods can be utilized.  So let us take FEMA as an example.

FEMA must follow the law and Presidential Orders as if it were law.  Three methods available to by pass Congress are:

  1. Presidential Policy Directive                                      (PPD)
  2. Homeland Security Presidential Directive             (HSPD)
  3. National Security Presidential Directive                 (NSPD)

We know FEMA is the Federal Emergency Management arm of the Federal Government.  However, like any and every other Department a law or Policy Directive is not limited to affecting only one Department.  The bureaucracy is distorter as a large ball of twine.

  • NIMS:  National Incident Management System
  • HSPD:   Homeland Security Presidential Directive
  • NSPD:   National Security Presidential Directive
  • PPD:      Presidential Policy Directive
  • EO:        Executive Order
  • SOP:      Standard Operating Procedure
  • NRF:      National Response Framework
  • HSPD 5                 Management of Domestic Incidents
  • HSPD 7                 Critical Infrastructure Identification, Prioritization, and Protection
  • HSPD 8                National Preparedness –

National Incident Management System: A system mandated by HSPD-5 that provides a consistent nationwide approach for Federal, State, local, and tribal governments; the private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work effectively and efficiently together to p(INSERT DEPARTMENT)are for, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity. To provide for interoperability and compatibility among Federal, State, local, and tribal capabilities, the NIMS includes a core set of concepts, principles, and terminology. HSPD-5 identifies these as the ICS; Multi-agency Coordination Systems; training; identification and management of resources (including systems for classifying types of resources); qualification and certification; and the collection, tracking, and (INSERT DEPARTMENT)orting of incident information and incident resources.

National Response Plan: A plan mandated by HSPD-5 that integrates Federal domestic prevention, (INSERT DEPARTMENT)aredness, response, and recovery plans into one all-discipline, all-hazards plan.

Prevention: Actions to avoid an incident or to intervene to stop an incident from occurring. Prevention involves actions to protect lives and property. It involves applying intelligence and other information to a range of activities that may include such countermeasures as deterrence operations; heightened inspections; improved surveillance and security operations; investigations to determine the full nature and source of the threat; public health and agricultural surveillance and testing processes; immunizations, isolation, or quarantine; and, as appropriate, specific law enforcement operations aimed at deterring, preempting, interdicting, or disrupting illegal activity and apprehending potential perpetrators and bringing them to justice

Terrorism: Under the Homeland Security Act of 2002, terrorism is defined as activity that involves an act dangerous to human life or potentially destructive of critical infrastructure or key resources and is a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State or other subdivision of the United States in which it occurs and is intended to intimidate or coerce the civilian population or influence a government or affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping. See Section 2 (15), Homeland Security Act of 2002, Pub. L. 107-296, 116 Stat. 213 5 (2002).

Emergency: Absent a Presidentially declared emergency, any incident(s), human-caused or natural, that requires responsive action to protect life or property. Under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, an emergency means any occasion or instance for which, in the determination of the President, Federal assistance is needed to supplement State and local efforts and capabilities to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, or to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe in any part of the United States.

Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs): The physical location at which the coordination of information

and resources to support domestic incident management activities normally takes place. An EOC may be a temporary facility or may be located in a more central or permanently established facility, perhaps at a higher level of organization within a jurisdiction. EOCs may be organized by major functional disciplines (e.g., fire, law enforcement, and medical services), by jurisdiction (e.g., Federal, State, regional, county, city, tribal), or some combination thereof.

Emergency Operations Plan: The “steady-state” plan maintained by various jurisdictional levels for responding to a wide variety of potential hazards.   xiii

Emergency Public Information: Information that is disseminated primarily in anticipation of an emergency or during an emergency. In addition to providing situational information to the public, it also frequently provides directive actions required to be taken by the general public.

Emergency Response Provider: Includes Federal, State, local, and tribal emergency public safety, law

enforcement, emergency response, emergency medical (including hospital emergency facilities), and related personnel, agencies, and authorities. See Section 2 (6), Homeland Security Act of 2002, Pub. L. 107-296, 116 Stat. 2135 (2002). Also known as Emergency Responder.

HSPD-5:  Management of Domestic Incidents – 

HSPD-5 was issued by President Bush on February 28, 2003, to improve management of domestic incidents by establishing a single, comprehensive national incident management system. The Homeland Security Act of 2002, created the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and assigned the Secretary of Homeland Security responsibility for coordinating federal emergency operations within the United States. Federal emergency operations include preparing for, responding to, and recovering from terrorist attacks, major disasters, and other emergencies. DHS coordinates federal resources when any one of several conditions occurs:

  1. a federal department or agency requests their assistance
  2. the resources of state and local authorities are overwhelmed and they request federal assistance
  3. more than one federal department or agency is substantially involved in responding to an incident
  4. the President directs the Secretary to assume responsibility for managing the domestic incident.

HSPD-5 also recognizes the role that state, tribal, and local governments; nongovernmental organizations; and the private sector play in managing incidents. Initial responsibility for managing domestic incidents generally falls on state and local authorities. When their resources are overwhelmed, or when federal property is involved, the federal government provides assistance.

In order to provide a consistent, coordinated, nation-wide approach for emergency operations across all levels of government, HSPD-5 directed DHS to develop and administer a National Incident Management System (NIMS) and a National Response Plan. Together, NIMS and the NRP provide an approach for federal, state, and local governments to effectively prepare for, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity.

HSPD-7:  Critical Infrastructure Identification, Prioritization, and Protection –  HSPD-7 specifically supercedes PDD-63.

HSPD-7, issued by President George W. Bush on December 17, 2003, establishes a national policy for federal departments and agencies to identify and prioritize critical U.S. infrastructure and key resources and to protect them from terrorist attacks. Federal departments and agencies will work with state and local governments and the private sector to accomplish this objective. HSPD-7 also identifies Sector-Specific Agencies which, under DHS’ overall coordination, lead efforts to protect specific critical sectors and key resources.

In addition, HSPD-7 requires DHS to develop a comprehensive, integrated National Plan for Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Protection (NPIP).

Sector-Specific Agencies

Sector-Specific Agencies are agencies responsible for ensuring the protection of a particular resource or part of the national infrastructure. For example, the Department of Energy is the Sector-Specific Agency for the energy sector of the economy.

Sector-Specific Agencies collaborate with other federal, state, and local governments and the private sector to assess and reduce vulnerabilities within the sector. They also encourage the use of risk-management strategies to protect against and mitigate the effects of attacks against the infrastructure and critical resources within the sector.

Nuclear Sector

HSPD-7 specifically requires DHS to work with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and, as appropriate, the Department of Energy to protect elements of the nuclear sector:

  • nuclear reactors used for generation, research, testing, and training
  • nuclear materials used in medical, industrial, and academic settings and facilities that fabricate nuclear fuel
  • the transportation, storage, and disposal of nuclear materials and waste.
  • EPA’s Role as a Sector-Specific Agency

EPA is designated as the Sector-Specific Agency for drinking water and water treatment systems. In addition to being responsible for collaborating across all levels of government, assessing vulnerabilities, and promoting the use of risk-management strategies, EPA must:

  • work with the water sector to reduce the consequences of catastrophic failures not caused by terrorism
  • collaborate with the private sector to continue the development of information sharing and analysis mechanisms
  • report to DHS on the Agency’s efforts to identify, prioritize, and coordinate the protection of critical infrastructure and key resources.

EPA’s Water Security
provides more information on EPA’s efforts to reduce the vulnerability of the nation’s water resources

General Critical Infrastructure Protection Responsibilities of All Agencies

In addition, HSPD-7 assigns EPA and other federal agencies and departments a number of general responsibilities related to critical infrastructure protection:

  • ensuring that homeland security programs do not diminish the overall economic security of the United States
  • appropriately protecting information associated with carrying out the directive, including voluntarily provided information and information that would facilitate terrorists’ targeting critical infrastructure and key resources
  • cooperating with DHS to estimate the potential impact of terrorist attacks on critical infrastructure and key resources
  • submitting a plan for protecting the physical and cyber critical infrastructure and key resources owned or operated by the department or agency. These plans address identification, prioritization, protection, and contingency planning, including the recovery and rebuilding of essential capabilities. (EPA has completed and submitted the Agency’s plan to DHS.)

HSPD-8  National Preparedness

As a companion to HSPD-5, HSPD-8 requires DHS to establish a national domestic all-hazards preparedness goal and describes the way federal departments and agencies will prepare for a response to a national incident. The intent of the national preparedness goal is to ensure that all levels of government work together toward a common, measurable state of readiness and have adequate support to meet the goal. It includes a system for assessing the Nation’s overall readiness to respond to major events, especially those involving acts of terrorism.

HSPD-8 names the Secretary of Homeland Security as the principal federal official for coordinating the implementation of all-hazards preparedness. DHS is undertaking a number of tasks to fulfill this role:

  • developing plans to identify the research and development needs of national first responders based on current and future threats
  • establishing a national program and planning system for conducting homeland security preparedness-related exercises
  • identifying classes of homeland security-related information and appropriate means for transmitting them into the system
  • developing and maintaining a federal response capability inventory that includes the readiness for deployment of staff and equipment.

Citizen Involvement

HSPD-8 encourages citizen involvement in preparedness efforts. The Secretary of Homeland Security is responsible for working with appropriate federal, state, and local government organizations and the private sector to encourage active citizen participation in preparedness efforts. DHS will periodically identify best practices for integrating private citizen capabilities into local preparedness efforts. In addition, DHS will develop a comprehensive plan to coordinate and provide accurate and timely preparedness information to the general public, first responders, government organizations, the private sector, and other organizations as needed.

EPA’s Role under HSPD-8

Under HSPD-8, EPA will coordinate with DHS when providing preparedness assistance to first responders, to ensure that all assistance supports the national preparedness goal.  The head of each federal department or agency (including EPA) is also responsible for ensuring that their agency is ready to fulfill its roles under the national preparedness goal and the NRP. Towards that end, EPA has been assigned a number of responsibilities:

  • adopting quantifiable performance measurements in the areas of training, planning, equipment, and exercises for federal incident management and asset preparedness
  • maintaining specialized assets such as teams, stockpiles, and caches at levels consistent with the national preparedness goal
  • ensuring specialized assets are available for response activities as called for in the National Response Plan, other appropriate operational documents, and applicable authorities or guidance
  • ensuring that relevant federal regulatory requirements are consistent with the national preparedness goal.

National Response Framework

Government resources alone cannot meet all the needs of those affected by terrorist attacks, natural disasters and other catastrophic events. When disaster strikes, people throughout the community and our nation pitch in to help the response effort.

The second edition of the National Response Framework, updated in 2013, provides context for how the whole community works together and how response efforts relate to other parts of national preparedness. It is one of the five documents in a suite of National Planning Frameworks. Each Framework covers one preparedness mission area: Prevention, Protection, Mitigation, Response or Recovery.

Resources

Focus on Immediate Needs

The Response Framework covers the capabilities necessary to save lives, protect property and the environment and meet basic human needs after an incident has occurred. Response activities take place immediately before, during and in the first few days after a major or catastrophic disaster. Then, recovery efforts begin to help the community get back on its feet.

Roles and activities found in other Frameworks affect response efforts in many ways. For example, when people proactively do things to lessen the impact of future disasters—as described in the National Mitigation Framework—they may need fewer response resources when a disaster strikes.

The Updated Response Framework

While some other Frameworks debuted in 2013, the second edition of the National Response Framework (NRF) is based on an existing version released in 2008. The new NRF incorporates a focus on whole community and core capabilities. For example, the Framework now describes the important roles of individuals, families and households in response activities.

Also, the Frameworks are intended to be strategic documents, with tactical planning and concept of operations content reserved for the new Federal Interagency Operational Plans (FIOPs). As a result, the revised NRF is shorter and more strategic than its predecessor.

Changes in the New NRF

The Emergency Support Functions (ESFs) maintain their prominence in the updated NRF, as they are a proven and effective way to bundle and manage resources. They are included as the primary coordinating structures at the federal level.

The revised National Response Framework:

  • Has a modified structure that is consistent with the other National Planning Frameworks released in 2013.
  • Incorporates the “whole community” term and concept. The concept is consistent with 2008 NRF but was not called “whole community” until the revision.
  • Recognizes Families, Individuals and Households as a main component of the whole community. The Framework has a section to describe their roles and responsibilities and incorporates related activities and coordinating structures.
  • Features the core capabilities aligned to the Response mission area and provides definitions, critical tasks and examples of organizations that deliver each capability.
  • Identifies the Emergency Support Functions (ESFs) as the primary federal coordinating structures for delivering Response core capabilities. The 2008 NRF included ESFs but did not formally recognize them as coordinating structures.
  • Removed the Planning chapter from the existing NRF, as it will have a more appropriate home in the new Response FIOP. The revised NRF briefly discusses planning and refers to the FIOP.
  • Removed the Recovery section, as the content now resides in the National Disaster Recovery Framework, released in 2011.
  • Removed the descriptions of positions and responsibilities at the field support structure level, as they will be covered in the Response FIOP.
  • Places greater emphasis on the role of federal agencies in non-Stafford Act incidents.

Response Core Capabilities

Core capabilities are the distinct elements needed to achieve the National Preparedness Goal. There are 14 covered in the National Response Framework:

  • Planning
  • Public Information and Warning
  • Operational Coordination
  • Critical Transportation
  • Environmental Response/Health and Safety
  • Fatality Management Services
  • Infrastructure Systems
  • Mass Care Services
  • Mass Search and Rescue Operations
  • On-Scene Security and Protection
  • Operational Communications
  • Public and Private Services and Resources
  • Public Health and Medical Services
  • Situational Assessment

The Framework also lists several critical tasks for each core capability. Here’s an example under the Public Information and Warning core capability:

Deliver credible messages to inform ongoing emergency services and the public about protective measures and other life-sustaining actions and facilitate the transition to recovery.

Mission Areas

Main Content

The National Preparedness Goal identified five mission areas, in which it groups the 31 core capabilities (the distinct critical elements needed to achieve the goal).

Prevention:  The Prevention mission area comprises the capabilities necessary to avoid, prevent or stop a threatened or actual act of terrorism. It is focused on ensuring we are optimally prepared to prevent an imminent terrorist attack within the United States.

Prevention Core Capabilities:

  • Planning
  • Public Information and Warning
  • Operational Coordination
  • Forensics and Attribution
  • Intelligence and Information Sharing
  • Interdiction and Disruption
  • Screening, Search, and Detection

See the core capabilities page for further descriptions.

Protection:  The Protection Framework houses “the capabilities necessary to secure the homeland against acts of terrorism and manmade or natural disasters.”

Protection Core Capabilities:

  • Planning
  • Public Information and Warning
  • Operational Coordination
  • Access Control and Identity Verification
  • Cybersecurity
  • Intelligence and Information Sharing
  • Interdiction and Disruption
  • Physical Protective Measures
  • Risk Management for Protection Programs and Activities
  • Screening, Search and Detection
  • Supply Chain Integrity and Security

See the core capabilities page for further descriptions.

Mitigation:  Mitigation comprises “the capabilities necessary to reduce the loss of life and property by lessening the impact of disasters.”

Mitigation Core Capabilities:

  • Planning
  • Public Information and Warning
  • Operational Coordination
  • Community Resilience
  • Long-Term Vulnerability Reduction
  • Risk and Disaster Resilience Assessment
  • Threats and Hazard Identification

See the core capabilities page for further descriptions.

Response:  Description: Response comprises “the capabilities necessary to save lives, protect property and the environment, and meet basic human needs after an incident has occurred.”

Response Core Capabilities:

  • Planning
  • Public Information and Warning
  • Operational Coordination
  • Critical Transportation
  • Environmental Response/Health and Safety
  • Fatality Management Services
  • Infrastructure Systems
  • Mass Care Services
  • Mass Search and Rescue Operations
  • On-Scene Security and Protection
  • Operational Communications
  • Public and Private Services and Resources
  • Public Health and Medical Services
  • Situational Assessment

See the core capabilities page for further descriptions.

Recovery   Recovery comprises “the core capabilities necessary to assist communities affected by an incident to recover effectively.”

Recovery Core Capabilities:

  • Planning
  • Public Information and Warning
  • Operational Coordination
  • Economic Recovery
  • Health and Social Services
  • Housing
  • Infrastructure Systems
  • Natural and Cultural Resources

See the core capabilities page for further descriptions

Core Capabilities List

Crosswalk of Target Capabilities to Core Capabilities

The following table maps the target capabilities outlined in the former Target Capabilities List (TCL) version 2.0, released in September 2007, to the new core capabilities outlined in the first edition of the National  Preparedness Goal. The mapping was performed such that all thirty-seven target capabilities from the TCL  were mapped; and each target capability was mapped to one, and only one, core capability. In a few cases, the alignment of a target capability to a single core capability is unclear—i.e., the target capability either did not match any core capabilities in a straightforward manner, or could be mapped to more than one core  capability.  Thus, the “Justification” column provides details as to the rationale used in the placement of the target capability.

Please note that not all core capabilities have a target capability associated with them. Furthermore, some core  capabilities have more than one target capability associated with them. Importantly, readers should not interpret that the target capabilities assigned to a core capability necessarily capture the entirety of what that core  capability is meant to address.

The core capabilities and their definitions are taken from the first edition of the National Preparedness Goal,  which was issued in September 2011. Descriptions of the target capabilities are excerpts taken from the Capability Description section of each target capability in the TCL.

This crosswalk was created to support the transition that states, localities, tribes, and territories face in realigning activities that may have previously been organized by the TCL to the new core capabilities as part of the 2011 State Preparedness Report effort. The contents are meant to provide additional context and stimulate thinking, but are for discussion purposes only, and should not be taken as official FEMA doctrine.

INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT COORDINATION  SUPPORT ANNEXES: INTRODUCTION

The Support Annexes describe how Federal departments and agencies; State, tribal, and local entities; the private sector; volunteer organizations; and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) coordinate and execute the common functional processes and administrative requirements necessary to ensure efficient and effective incident management. During an incident, numerous procedures and administrative functions are required to support incident management.

The actions described in the Support Annexes are not limited to particular types of events but are overarching in nature and applicable to nearly every type of incident. In addition, they may support several Emergency Support Functions (ESFs). Examples include public affairs,  international affairs, and worker safety and health.  The Support Annexes may be fully or partially implemented without the Secretary of Homeland Security coordinating Federal operations.  The following section includes a series of annexes describing the roles and responsibilities of Federal departments and agencies, NGOs, and the private sector for those common activities that support the majority of incidents. The annexes address the following areas:

  1. Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources
  2. Financial Management
  3. International Coordination
  4. Private-Sector Coordination
  5. Public Affairs
  6. Tribal Relations
  7. Volunteer and Donations Management
  8. Worker Safety and Health

General – Stafford Act Declarations

The President may direct any Federal agency pursuant to the authorities in sections 402, 403, and 502 of the Stafford Act.

The Disaster Relief Fund (DRF), appropriated to DHS/FEMA, is available for purposes of the Stafford Act. Reimbursement may be provided from the DRF for activities conducted pursuant to these sections.  The DRF is not available for activities not authorized by the Stafford Act, for activities undertaken under other authorities or agency

Strategic National Response assessment states

Political, economic, environmental, and societal trends that may contribute to a changing  risk environment but are not explicitly homeland security national-level events (e.g., demographic shifts, economic trends). These trends will be important to include in future iterations of a national risk assessment, however.

FEMA & “FEDERAL PARTNERS”

International Coordination

  • The Secretary of State is responsible for managing international preparedness,
  • response, and recovery activities relating to domestic incidents and the protection of
  • U.S. citizens and U.S. interests overseas.

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTNER GUIDE INTRODUCTION

The National Response Framework (NRF) is a comprehensive national guidance document that addresses roles, responsibilities, activities, and interdependencies for partners involved in response and short-term recovery actions to disasters and emergencies in the United States. This includes local, tribal, State, and Federal governments, as well as  nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the private sector.

This Partner Guide provides a targeted index to information in the NRF core document that is specifically pertinent to Federal Government leaders and emergency management practitioners. The Guide is intended to serve as a ready reference to assist users in quickly locating sections of the NRF that are applicable to Federal partners.

LIST OF FEMA EARTHQUAKE PARTNERS:  Non-Governmental Partners

  1. American Association for the Advancement  of Science (AAAS)  Alan I. Leshner, Chief Executive Officer
  2. Beth Rosner, Director of AAAS Office of Publishing  brosner@aaas.org  202-326-6550
  3. American Association of Code Enforcement (AACE)  http://www.aace1.org
  4. American Association of School Administrators (AASA)  http://www.aasa.org
  5. The School Administrator Jay Goldman, Editor  jgoldman@aasa.org   703-875-0745
  6. American Concrete Institute (ACI)  http://www.concrete.org
  7. American Geosciences Institute (AGI)  http://www.agiweb.org
  8. American Geophysical Union (AGU)  http://www.agu.org
  9. American Institute of Architects (AIA)  http://www.aia.org
  10. American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC)  http://www.aisc.org
  11. American Insurance Association (AIA)  http://www.aiadc.org
  12. American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI)  http://www.steel.org
  13. American Library Association (ALA)  http://www.ala.org
  14. American Meteorological Society (AMS)  http://www.ametsoc.org
  15. American Planning Association (APA)  http://www.planning.org
  16. American Society for Healthcare Engineering (ASHE)  http://www.ashe.org
  17. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)  http://www.astm.org
  18. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)  http://www.asce.org
  19. Applied Technology Council (ATC)  http://www.atcouncil.org
  20. Associated General Contractors of America (AGC)  http://www.agc.org
  21. Association for Middle Level Education  (AMLE)  http://www.amle.org
  22. Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists (AEG)  http://www.aegweb.org
  23. Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) International  http://www.boma.org
  24. Council of State Governments (CSG)  http://www.csg.org
  25. Earthquake Country Alliance (ECA)  http://www.earthquakecountry.info
  26. Earthquake Engineering Research  Institute (EERI)  http://www.eeri.org
  27. Federal Alliance for Safe Homes, Inc.  (FLASH)  http://www.flash.org
  28. Geological Society of America (GSA)  http://www.geosociety.org
  29. Insurance Institute for Business & Home  Safety (IBHS)  http://www.disastersafety.org
  30. International Association of Chiefs of Police  http://www.theiacp.org
  31. International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM)  http://www.iaem.com
  32. International City/County Management Association (ICMA)  www.icma.org
  33. International Code Council (ICC)  http://www.iccsafe.org
  34. International Facilities Management Association (IFMA)  http://www.ifma.org
  35. National Association of Counties (NACo)  http://www.naco.org
  36. National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP)  http://www.naesp.org
  37. National Association of Home Builders (NAHB)  http://www.nahb.org
  38. National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP)  http://www.principals.org
  39. National Association of Professional  Insurance Agents (PIA)  http://www.pianet.org

 Every county must prepare this document

  1. Facilitates response and short-term recovery activities. The SOP describes and provides the basis for a community’s response and short-term recovery operations. The response activities typically take place  initially and are designed to save lives, reduce suffering, protect property and the environment.  The short-term recovery activities typically follow the response activities and are designed to stabilize the situation and set the stage for re-entry and recovery.
  2. The recovery aspect is primarily guided by the State Emergency Operating Facility which houses state  agencies and has access to federal agencies to assist in the recovery process.
  3. Flexible enough to use in all emergencies, although is primarily geared toward specific hazards, it does reflect the local jurisdiction’s approach to all types of emergencies. The functional annexes provide an outline of roles and responsibilities of each responding agency regardless of the type of emergency.
  4. Describes its purpose in emergency situations. The purpose includes a general statement of what the SOP is meant to do. It also includes a brief summary of the components of the plan including the functional annexes and hazard-specific appendices.
  5. Describes the situation and assumptions. The situation sets the stage for planning. It is based on the local jurisdiction’s hazard identification analysis. It includes a section with a characterization of the population, and the impact of the hazard. The assumptions describe those things that are assumed to
  6. be true that directly impact the execution of the SOP.
  7. Describes the concept of operations. The concept of operations captures the sequence and scope of  the planned response, explaining the overall approach to the emergency situation. The concept of  operations includes the division of responsibilities, sequence of action (before, during and after the incident), how requests for resources will be met, and who and under what circumstances will request be made for additional aid from the State (this includes the process for declaring a state of emergency).  The concept of operations contains direction and control, alert and warning, or other activities. The  information is outlined in the basic plan and fully detailed in the functional and hazard specific annexes and appendices.
  8. Describes the organization and assignment of responsibilities and establishes which organizations will be relied upon to respond to the emergency. The SOP describes the tasks each element of the organization is responsible for and expected to perform. The description of these responsibilities is  typically generic in the Basic Plan and more detailed in functional and hazard specific annexes and appendices. The Basic Plan typically contains a matrix that plots response functions by agency and allows for a quick clarification of the assignment of primary and support responsibilities.
  9. Describes administration and logistics the general support requirements and availability of support services from other agencies.
  10. The (INSERT DEPARTMENT) SOP is maintained on annual basis with a review being done by the annex heads at the county and reviewed at the state and federal level.
  11. The SOP references the Michigan Emergency Management Act, Public Act 390 as amended which is the authority under which the state operates during disaster situations.
  12. Functional annexes are the part of the SOP that provide specific information and direction, contain activities to be performed by anyone with a responsibility under that function, and clearly define actions before, during and after an emergency event.
  13. Hazard specific appendices are supplements to functional annexes.
  14. Contains a glossary and definitions.
  15. Pre-designates which organizations are assigned which responsibilities and which organizations should provide (INSERT DEPARTMENT) resentatives to the EOC. These are established at both the county and state.
  16. The SOP includes pre-incident and post-incident public awareness, education, and communications plans and protocols. The SOP describes the public awareness and education that the community is provided. Public awareness and education provides valuable information to citizens about potential hazards, protective action options for those hazards, also how they will be alerted and notified if they are  at risk. How this information will be communicated to the public before and after incidents occur is described in the SOP.

RELATIONSHIPS AMONG PLANNING DOCUMENTS AND PROCEDURES

National Incident Management System: A system mandated by HSPD-5 that provides a consistent nationwide approach for Federal, State, local, and tribal governments; the private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work effectively and efficiently together to (INSERT DEPARTMENT)are for, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity. To provide for interoperability and compatibility among Federal, State, local, and tribal capabilities, the NIMS includes a core set of concepts, principles, and terminology.  HSPD-5 identifies these as the ICS; Multi-agency Coordination Systems; training; identification and management of resources (including systems for classifying types of resources); qualification and certification; and the collection, tracking, and (INSERT DEPARTMENT)supporting of incident information and incident resources.

National Response Plan: A plan mandated by HSPD-5 that integrates Federal domestic prevention,  (INSERT DEPARTMENT) preparedness, response, and recovery plans into one all-discipline, all-hazards plan.

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs): Exist within the county and state for use by response organizations. These SOPs contain specific instructions on how a specific task is to be handled.

Emergency Operations Plan: This plan sets forth the policies and guidelines for the local and tribal jurisdiction and identifies the responsibilities to p(INSERT DEPARTMENT)are for, mitigate against, respond to, and recover from threats the jurisdiction faces. The SOP also identifies the EOC and discusses the concept of operations, as well as the command and control structure based on NIMS ICS when the EOC is activated as part of a Multi-agency Coordination System. The EOC supports and coordinates the field operations based on NIMS ICS and the SOP describes how the support functions fit into that system.

Functional Annexes: Whether in the Federal ESF format or the traditional SLG-101 format, functional annexes set forth concepts of operations, identify responsible agencies, and describe missions or responsibilities that apply to various areas of hazard response and recovery (i.e., transportation, law enforcement, public warning, mass care, etc.). When applicable, functional annexes describe the role of various support agencies in support of the lead agency (INSERT DEPARTMENT) representative(s) staffing the EOC.

Hazard-specific Annexes: These describe concepts of operation for specific threats. They identify strategies for detecting, assessing, and controlling the hazard; warning and protecting the public; and returning the area to a state of normalcy. Hazard-specific annexes identify mission considerations that will require coordination through the EOC, as well as the functional areas involved. They should also identify potential State and Federal resources that may be needed should the hazard exceed the local capabilities.

Procedural Documents

The following types of procedural documents are in place in many EOCs across the country. In many local and tribal jurisdictions, how the various procedural documents interrelate has not been explored in full, nor has their relevance to NIMS.

  1. The (INSERT DEPARTMENT) SOP has policies for requesting Federal assistance through the State and mutual aid agreements that exist between local jurisdictions. Established succession or a continuity of operations plan is outlined in the SOP
  2. The SOP outlines when to activate their EOC, and includes levels of activation based on the event in progress. The local SOP also outlines policies for requesting resources from the State?
  1. There are established policies regarding EOC access during emergencies and access control policies to incident scenes.
  2. The local or tribal jurisdiction established (INSERT DEPARTMENT)orting mechanisms in coordination with State governmental officials and EOCs to communicate information regarding actual or potential Incidents of National Significance to the Homeland Security Operations Center (HSOC), as outlined on pg. 47 of the NRP.
  3. The local jurisdiction has policies in place for rapid needs assessment, and coordinating with the State and Federal damage assessment teams after an event.
  4. The local or tribal jurisdiction has documented policies for requesting post disaster assistance from the Federal government including public assistance and individual assistance from FEMA.
  5. The local jurisdiction has policies in place to handle mass care. support evacuations or sheltering in place operations, for search and rescue operations, to handle casualties and mass fatalities, and for requesting Federal assistance through the State.

Definitions:

Major Disaster: As defined under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 122), a major disaster is any natural catastrophe (including any hurricane, tornado, storm, high water, wind-driven ater, tidal wave, tsunami, earthquake, volcanic eruption, landslide, mudslide, snowstorm, or drought), or, regardless of cause, any fire, flood, or explosion, in any part of the United States, which in the determination of the President causes damage of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant disaster assistance under this Act to supplement the efforts and available resources of States, vitribes, local governments, and disaster relief organizations in alleviating the damage, loss, hardship, or suffering caused thereby.

FEMA and Federal Partners Continue to Mobilize Resources and Urge Residents to Make Final Preparations

Main Content

Release date: 

OCTOBER 29, 2012

Release Number: 

HQ-12-121

WASHINGTON – At the direction of President Obama, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is coordinating the federal government’s assistance and preparations to support states affected by Hurricane Sandy. Today, the President received a briefing on Hurricane Sandy in the White House Situation Room, including an update on the deployment of teams and resources to potentially affected areas by Homeland Security Secretary Napolitano, FEMA Administrator Fugate, Transportation Secretary Lahood, Energy Secretary Chu and National Hurricane Center Director Richard Knabb.

The President has authorized emergency declarations for Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. The President’s action authorizes FEMA to coordinate all disaster relief efforts to provide assistance for required emergency measures to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety.  The President continues to direct Administrator Fugate to ensure that federal partners continue to bring all available resources to bear to support state, tribal, and local responders in potentially affected areas.

Currently, more than 1,500 FEMA personnel are positioned along the East Coast working to support disaster preparedness and response operations, including search and rescue, situational awareness, communications and logistical support.  In addition, 28 teams comprised of 294 FEMA Corps members are pre-staged to support Sandy. Three federal urban search and rescue task forces are positioned in the Mid-Atlantic and ready to deploy as needed and requested.  An additional four federal search and rescue task forces in the Mid-west have been placed on alert and are ready for deployment, as requested and needed.  14 Incident Management Assistance Teams and 12 liaison officers are positioned in potentially affected states along the East Coast to support preparedness activities and ensure there are no unmet needs.  Mobile Emergency Response Support (MERS) personnel and teams have been deployed to support the states with secure and non-secure voice, video, and information services, operations, and logistics support to state response operations as well as with any potential requests for assistance. FEMA disability integration advisors are also deployed to advise emergency management on alert and warning, evacuation, and sheltering needs.

At all times, FEMA maintains commodities, including millions of liters of water, millions of meals and hundreds of thousands of blankets, strategically located at distribution centers throughout the United States and its territories, including Atlanta, Ga. and Frederick, Md., if needed and requested.  FEMA distribution centers have an overall inventory of more than 5 million liters of water, 3 million meals, 900,000 blankets and 100,000 cots.  FEMA and the Department of Defense established Incident Support Bases in Westover, Mass. and Lakehurst, New Jersey to pre-position supplies including water, meals, blankets and other resources closer to potentially impacted areas, should they be needed and requested by states.  As of this morning, FEMA has moved roughly 200,000 liters of water, 100,000 meals and thousands of blankets and cots to Westover Air Reserve Base; and more than 400,000 liters of water and more than 390,000 meals and thousands of cots to Lakehurst Naval Air Station in Lakehurst, New Jersey, and more commodities are en route, as weather conditions permit. 

FEMA and International Affairs

National Exercise Program (NEP) – Capstone Exercise 2014

Main Content

Number National Security Presidential Directive  ( NSPD )  Title Date
NSPD 1 Organization of the National Security Council System 13 February 01
NSPD 2 Improving Military Quality of Life 15 February 01
NSPD 3 Defense Strategy, Force Structure, and Procurement 15 February 01
NSPD 4 Transforming Deterrence 15 February 01
NSPD 5 [Review of U.S. intelligence] 9 May 01
NSPD 6
NSPD 7
NSPD 8 National Director and Deputy National Security Advisor for Combating Terrorism
NSPD 9 Defeating the Terrorist Threat to the United States 25 October 01
NSPD 10 U.S. Strategic Nuclear Forces 21 December 01
NSPD 12 United States Citizens Taken Hostage Abroad 18 February 02
NSPD 13 United States Policy and Organization for the Implementation of the Treaty on Open Skies 16 May 02
NSPD 14 Nuclear Weapons Planning Guidance 28 June 02
NSPD 15 National Space Policy Review [resulting in U.S. Commercial Remote Sensing Policy, 25 April 2003] 28 June 02
NSPD 16 [To Develop Guidelines for Offensive Cyber-Warfare] XX July 02(?)
NSPD 17 [National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction] (unclassified version)(PDF) 11 Dec 02(unclassified)
14 Sep 02(classified)
NSPD XX(?) [Authorizing Training for Iraqi Opposition Forces] 03 Oct 02(?)
NSPD 18 Supporting Democracy in Colombia Nov 02
NSPD 19 [Review of Defense Trade Export Policy]
NSPD 20 Counterproliferation Interdiction
NSPD 21 Support for Inspections in Iraq Nov 02
NSPD 22 Trafficking in Persons 16 Dec 02
NSPD 23 National Policy on Ballistic Missile Defense 16 Dec 02
NSPD 24 [Post-War Iraq Reconstruction] 20 January 2003
NSPD 25 [directs U.S. government agencies to attack the vulnerabilities of drug trafficking organizations]
NSPD 26 Intelligence Priorities 24 February 2003
NSPD 27 U.S. Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy 25 April 2003
NSPD 28 United States Nuclear Weapons Command and Control, Safety, and Security 20 June 2003
NSPD 29 [Transition to Democracy in Cuba] 30 November 2003
NSPD 31 U.S. Space Exploration Policy 14 January 2004
NSPD 32 [Latin America Policy]
NSPD 33 Biodefense for the 21st Century 28 April 2004
NSPD 34 Fiscal Year 2004-2012 Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Plan May 2004
NSPD 35 Nuclear Weapons Deployment Authorization 6 May 2004
NSPD 36 United States Government Operations in Iraq 11 May 2004
NSPD 37 Relating to Support of Iraqi Government 2004
NSPD 38 National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace 7 July 2004
NSPD 39 U.S. Space-Based Position, Navigation, and Timing Policy 08 December 2004
NSPD 40 U.S. Space Transportation Policy 21 December 2004
NSPD 41 Maritime Security Policy 21 December 2004
NSPD 42 On Significant Military Exercise Briefs (SMEB) 26 January 2005
NSPD 43 Domestic Nuclear Detection 15 April 2005
NSPD 44 Management of Interagency Efforts Concerning Reconstruction and Stabilization (Fact Sheet) 7 December 2005
NSPD 46 U.S. Strategy and Policy in the War on Terror 6 March 2006
NSPD 47 National Strategy for Aviation Security 22 June 2006
NSPD 48 Nuclear Materials Information Program 28 August 2006
NSPD 49 U.S. National Space Policy 31 August 2006
NSPD 50 U.S. Strategy for Sub-Saharan Africa 2007
NSPD 51 National Continuity Policy 4 April 2007
NSPD 54 Cyber Security and Monitoring [see WH release on Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative, March 2, 2010] 8 January 2008
NSPD 55 [on dual-use export controls] January 2008
NSPD 56 Defense Trade Reform 22 January 2008
NSPD 57 Implementation of the US-IAEA Additional Protocol 04 February 2008
NSPD 58 Advancing the Freedom Agenda (Fact Sheet) 21 May 2008 (?)
NSPD 59 Biometrics for Identification and Screening to Enhance National Security 5 June 2008
NSPD 66 Arctic Region Policy
Number Homeland Security Presidential Directive Title  HSPD Date
HSPD 1 Organization and Operation of the Homeland Security Council 29 Oct 01
HSPD 2 Combating Terrorism Through Immigration Policies 29 Oct 01
HSPD 3 Homeland Security Advisory System 11 March 02
HSPD 4 National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction (unclassified version) 11 December 02
HSPD 5 Management of Domestic Incidents [Initial National Response Plan, 30 September 03] 28 February 03
HSPD 6 Integration and Use of Screening Information to Protect Against Terrorism 16 September 03
HSPD 7 Critical Infrastructure Identification, Prioritization, and Protection 17 December 03
HSPD 8 National Preparedness 17 December 03
HSPD 9 Defense of United States Agriculture and Food 30 January 04
HSPD 10 Biodefense for the 21st Century 28 April 04
HSPD 11 Comprehensive Terrorist-Related Screening Procedures 27 August 04
HSPD 12 Policy for a Common Identification Standard for Federal Employees and Contractors 27 August 04
HSPD 13 Maritime Security Policy 21 December 2004
HSPD 14 Domestic Nuclear Detection 15 April 2005
HSPD 15 U.S. Strategy and Policy in the War on Terror (classified directive) 6 March 2006
HSPD 16 National Strategy for Aviation Security 22 June 2006
HSPD 17 Nuclear Materials Information Program 28 August 2006
HSPD 18 Medical Countermeasures Against Weapons of Mass Destruction 31 January 2007
HSPD 19 Combating Terrorist Use of Explosives in the United States 12 February 2007
HSPD 20 National Continuity Policy 4 April 2007
HSPD 21 Public Health and Medical Preparedness 18 October 2007
HSPD 22 Domestic Chemical Defense
HSPD 23 Cyber Security and Monitoring 8 January 2008
HSPD 24 Biometrics for Identification and Screening to Enhance National Security 5 June 2008
HSPD 25 Arctic Region Policy
Presidential Policy Directive (PPD) TITLE of P.P.D.
PPD 1 Organization of the National Security Council System 02/13/09
PPD 2 Implementation of the National Strategy for Countering Biological Threats (National Strategy) 11/23/09
PPD 3
PPD 4 National Space Policy (Fact Sheet) 06/29/10
PPD 5
PPD 6 Global Development (Fact Sheet) 09/22/10
PPD 7 National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) 01/26/11
PPD 8 National Preparedness 03/30/11
PPD 9
PPD 10 US Ballistic Missile Defenses
PPD 11 [terms of reference for Nuclear Posture Review implementation study]
PPD 12
PPD 13 Political and Economic Reform in the Middle East and North Africa
PPD 14 Procedures Implementing Section 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Fact Sheet) 02/28/12
PPD 15 Implementation of the Treaty on Open Skies 03/01/12
PPD 16 U.S. Strategy for Sub-Saharan Africa 06/14/12
PPD 17 Countering Improvised Explosive Devices
PPD 18 National Strategy for Maritime Security
PPD 19 Protecting Whistleblowers with Access to Classified Information 10/10/12
PPD 20 U.S. Cyber Operations Policy (Fact Sheet) 10/16/12
PPD 21 Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience 02/12/13
PPD 22
PPD 23 Security Sector Assistance (Fact Sheet) 04/05/13
PPD 24 [nuclear weapons employment guidance]
PPD 25
PPD 26
PPD 27 United States Conventional Arms Transfer Policy 01/15/14
PPD 28 Signals Intelligence Activities 01/17/14

Sources and Resources

 

1)       Obama orders US to draw up overseas target list for cyber-attacks by Glenn Greenwald and Ewen MacAskill, The Guardian, June 7, 2013

2)       Statement by the White House Press Secretary on the U.S. Security Sector Assistance Policy, April 5, 2013

3)       USAID/Ghana Country Development Cooperation Strategy, 2013-2017

4)       AP Story on “Steep” Nuclear Cuts by Jeffrey Lewis, ArmsControlWonk, February 17, 2012

5)       The Future of America’s Partnership with Sub-Saharan Africa, The White House, June 14, 2012

6)       Obama signs secret cybersecurity directive, allowing more aggressive military role by Ellen Nakashima, Washington Post, November 14, 2012

7)       The National Security Policy Process: The National Security Council and Interagency System by Alan G. Whittaker, Shannon A. Brown, Frederick C. Smith, and Ambassador Elizabeth McKune, Industrial College of the Armed Forces, National Defense University, August 15, 2011

8)       Presidential Policy Directive-2 (PPD-2) Implementing National Strategy for Countering Biological ThreatsPublic Intelligence, August 16, 2011

9)       Obama Signs Policy Directive on Preparedness by Marc Ambinder, National Journal, April 5, 2011

10)   Obama is “changing the way we do business” on development by Josh Rogin, The Cable, September 22, 2010

11)   The 21st Century Interagency Process, National Security Advisory Gen. James L. Jones, March 19, 2009, via New NSC memo: Jones on the 21st century interagency process by Laura Rozen, The Cable, April 6, 2009

Executive Orders on National Security

Executive orders are official documents, numbered consecutively, through which the President of the United States manages the operations of the Federal Government. The text of Executive orders appears in the daily Federal Register as each Executive order is signed by the President and received by the Office of the Federal Register. The text of Executive orders beginning with Executive Order 7316 of March 13, 1936, also appears in the sequential editions of Title 3 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).

A complete collection of Executive Orders is available at the National Archives.

Number Document Title Date Status
EO 13456 FURTHER AMENDMENT OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 11858 CONCERNING FOREIGN INVESTMENT IN THE UNITED STATES 23 January 2008
EO 13458 IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 4 February 2008
EO 13462 PRESIDENT’S INTELLIGENCE ADVISORY BOARD AND INTELLIGENCE OVERSIGHT BOARD 29 February 2008
EO 13467 REFORMING PROCESSES RELATED TO SUITABILITY FOR GOVERNMENT EMPLOYMENT, FITNESS FOR CONTRACTOR EMPLOYEES, AND ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION 30 June 2008
EO 13470 FURTHER AMENDMENTS TO EXECUTIVE ORDER 12333, UNITED STATES INTELLIGENCE ACTIVITIES 30 July 2008
EO 13475 FURTHER AMENDMENTS TO EXECUTIVE ORDERS 12139 AND 12949 IN LIGHT OF THE FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE SURVEILLANCE ACT OF 1978 AMENDMENTS ACT OF 2008 7 October 2008
EO 13476 FACILITATION OF A PRESIDENTIAL TRANSITION 9 October 2008
EO 13486 STRENGTHENING LABORATORY BIOSECURITY IN THE UNITED STATES 9 January 2009
EO 13489 PRESIDENTIAL RECORDS 21 January 2009
EO 13491 ENSURING LAWFUL INTERROGATIONS 22 January 2009
EO 13492 REVIEW AND DISPOSITION OF INDIVIDUALS DETAINED AT THE GUANTÁNAMO BAY NAVAL BASE AND CLOSURE OF DETENTION FACILITIES 22 January 2009
EO 13493 REVIEW OF DETENTION POLICY OPTIONS 22 January 2009
EO 13516 AMENDING EXECUTIVE ORDER 13462 28 October 2009
EO 13526 CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION 29 December 2009
EO 13527 ESTABLISHING FEDERAL CAPABILITY FOR THE TIMELY PROVISION OF MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES FOLLOWING A BIOLOGICAL ATTACK 30 December 2009
EO 13546 OPTIMIZING THE SECURITY OF BIOLOGICAL SELECT AGENTS AND TOXINS IN THE UNITED STATES 2 July 2010
EO 13549 CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION PROGRAM FOR STATE, LOCAL, TRIBAL, AND PRIVATE SECTOR ENTITIES 18 August 2010
EO 13551 BLOCKING PROPERTY OF CERTAIN PERSONS WITH RESPECT TO NORTH KOREA 30 August 2010
EO 13556 CONTROLLED UNCLASSIFIED INFORMATION 04 November 2010
EO 13567 PERIODIC REVIEW OF INDIVIDUALS DETAINED AT GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL STATION PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORIZATION FOR USE OF MILITARY FORCE 07 March 2011
EO 13584 DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED STRATEGIC COUNTERRORISM COMMUNICATIONS INITIATIVE AND ESTABLISHING A TEMPORARY ORGANIZATION TO SUPPORT CERTAIN GOVERNMENT-WIDE COMMUNICATIONS ACTIVITIES DIRECTED ABROAD 09 September 2011
EO 13587 STRUCTURAL REFORMS TO IMPROVE THE SECURITY OF CLASSIFIED NETWORKS AND THE RESPONSIBLE SHARING AND SAFEGUARDING OF CLASSIFIED INFORMATION 07 October 2011
EO 13603 NATIONAL DEFENSE RESOURCES PREPAREDNESS 16 March 2012
EO 13606 BLOCKING THE PROPERTY AND SUSPENDING ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES OF CERTAIN PERSONS WITH RESPECT TO GRAVE HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES BY THE GOVERNMENTS OF IRAN AND SYRIA VIA INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 22 April 2012
EO 13617 BLOCKING PROPERTY OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION RELATING TO THE DISPOSITION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM EXTRACTED FROM NUCLEAR WEAPONS 25 June 2012
EO 13618 ASSIGNMENT OF NATIONAL SECURITY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS COMMUNICATIONS FUNCTIONS 6 July 2012
EO 13636 IMPROVING CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE CYBERSECURITY 12 February 2013
EO 13637 ADMINISTRATION OF REFORMED EXPORT CONTROLS 8 March 2013
EO 13642 MAKING OPEN AND MACHINE READABLE THE NEW DEFAULT FOR GOVERNMENT INFORMATION 9 May 2013
EO 13650 IMPROVING CHEMICAL FACILITY SAFETY AND SECURITY 1 August 2013

PRIVACY AND CIVIL LIBERTIES OVERSIGHT BOARD

Report on the Telephone Records Program  Conducted under Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act and on the Operations of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court

 

JANUARY 23, 2014



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